Fun toy the Navy could add with a Polywell-equipped fleet

If polywell fusion is developed, in what ways will the world change for better or worse? Discuss.

Moderators: tonybarry, MSimon

MSimon
Posts: 14331
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:37 pm
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Contact:

Postby MSimon » Wed Feb 04, 2009 1:07 am

Billy Catringer wrote:Fair enough! Just remember that you will have to change that water out regularly or run it through treatment every day or so. Demin water likes metals. It starts dissolving them fairly quickly.


I was a Naval Nuke. We paid a lot of attention to water quality. pH, dissolved solids etc. And not just in the primary loop. With the instrumentation available today the whole operation is easily automated.
Engineering is the art of making what you want from what you can get at a profit.

kunkmiester
Posts: 876
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:51 pm
Contact:

Postby kunkmiester » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:44 pm

From what I can tell, a polywell and all it's attendant stuff(cryo, power converters, etc.) takes up about as much space as the reactor and steam gear for a fission system. On the other hand, the shielding and other concerns are less, meaning it's a lot lighter.

There's also this:
http://nextbigfuture.com/2009/01/365-me ... motor.html

Which makes the cryo plant dual purpose.
Evil is evil, no matter how small

MSimon
Posts: 14331
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:37 pm
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Contact:

Postby MSimon » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:21 pm

kunkmiester wrote:From what I can tell, a polywell and all it's attendant stuff(cryo, power converters, etc.) takes up about as much space as the reactor and steam gear for a fission system. On the other hand, the shielding and other concerns are less, meaning it's a lot lighter.

There's also this:
http://nextbigfuture.com/2009/01/365-me ... motor.html

Which makes the cryo plant dual purpose.


Handy. That.
Engineering is the art of making what you want from what you can get at a profit.

D Tibbets
Posts: 2775
Joined: Thu Jun 26, 2008 6:52 am

Postby D Tibbets » Mon Jun 08, 2009 12:13 am

Speaking of superconducting moters, along with magrids. On a thread talking about ITER problems, it's mentioned that alot of thermal energy can be released if the supeconducter quenches. How robust can a 35 MW superconducting moter be considering the large torques it will need to handle?


Dan Tibbets
To error is human... and I'm very human.

MSimon
Posts: 14331
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:37 pm
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Contact:

Postby MSimon » Mon Jun 08, 2009 2:54 am

D Tibbets wrote:Speaking of superconducting moters, along with magrids. On a thread talking about ITER problems, it's mentioned that alot of thermal energy can be released if the supeconducter quenches. How robust can a 35 MW superconducting moter be considering the large torques it will need to handle?

Dan Tibbets


The design must be fairly robust because the Navy is interested in it for ship propulsion.
Engineering is the art of making what you want from what you can get at a profit.


Return to “Implications”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests