Bose Condensate question

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Johntop
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Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:58 pm

Bose Condensate question

Post by Johntop »

1) Newbie to this board.

2) Engineering background in a totally different field. Just an interested spectator here.

3) Most appreciative of the generally even handed dialog on this board.

4) I have an itching curiosity regarding Bose supernova if someone cares to educate me. There isn’t much I can access that makes sense on this topic (mostly just the goofy speculations around the LHC that brought this to my attention). Mea culpa if this too is obvious or silly, implosion descriptions notwithstanding I’m pretty sure the supernova label doesn’t really mean there is a fusion process going on: Is the missing matter in the Bose supernova remnant somehow released as energy, or is it thought to have just gone away somewhere? If the former, are we able to reproducibly create Bose Supernova events? If so, is there a snowball’s chance of breakeven energy?

Thanks in advance. I’m awaiting developments in the news forum of this board with the same bated breath as everyone else.
John

drmike
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Post by drmike »

OK, I've never heard of a "bose supernova" before, so I did a google search and found this from NIST. Some how a connection has been made between the lowest energy possible of absolute zero and the highest energy possible in the LHC!

Both sets of physics are very interesting, but neither will change the universe very much. They consume a lot of energy to do the experiments so they are not sources of energy either.

Edit: forgot one word in first sentence!

Johntop
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:58 pm

Post by Johntop »

Thx DrMike

This article was one of the sources that prompted my question. Basically I'm wondering where the missing mass went and then, should the answer be interesting, if there is anything we can get back for it.

I assume the lost mass is really just an artifact of the way measurements are taken in these experients, but "supernova" sounds like it should produce something doesn't it?

Does anyone know where the missing mass goes?
John

Skipjack
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Post by Skipjack »

Welcome John!
New here too, good to see more people joining!

drmike
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Post by drmike »

The experiment is done at (within 10^-8 degrees) absolute zero, so most of their equipment is probably slow. The "missing mass" just left the region faster than their detectors reacted, that's all. It would be really cool if it tunneled through space, it's a quantum wave block after all. But I bet the real action is much more mundane.

Johntop
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:58 pm

Thanks

Post by Johntop »

And thanks again Dr Mike. I figured it was likely somenting or the sort, but fantasy of some quantum effect piling up to high density, combined with the suggestive name they have given the effect, just created an itch to explore. Thanks again for scratching

John
John

drmike
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Post by drmike »

Never stop asking questions! Everybody learns something new.
:D

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