Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

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hanelyp
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Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 8:50 pm

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by hanelyp »

Barrycade, as usual, speaks nonsense.
The daylight is uncomfortably bright for eyes so long in the dark.

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

This won't get much air time in our "objective" main stream national media:


Virginia Beach shooting victim considered taking gun to work over concerns about colleague, lawyer says


ImageAttorney Kevin Martingayle speaks during a civil trial in Virginia Beach. He represents the family of Kate Nixon, one of 12 shot and killed in the Virginia Beach Municipal Center on May 31, 2019.

Kate Nixon had considered taking a gun to work on May 31, the day a co-worker killed her and 11 others in the country's deadliest mass shooting this year, a family attorney said on a radio show Monday. The public utilities engineer was concerned about DeWayne Craddock "as well as one other person," said Kevin Martingayle, an attorney working with Nixon's family. So on the night of May 30, Nixon had discussed with her husband, Jason, "whether or not she should take a pistol and hide it in her handbag," Martingayle said. She decided against it because of a city policy that prevents employees from bringing weapons to work. The next day, Craddock, who had worked as a city public utilities engineer for nine years, used a .45-caliber handgun with a legally purchased silencer to fire at colleagues in Building 2 of the city's Municipal Center in Princess Anne.
VIRGINIA BEACH

Kate Nixon had considered taking a gun to work on May 31, the day a co-worker killed her and 11 others in the country's deadliest mass shooting this year, a family attorney said on a radio show Monday.

The public utilities engineer was concerned about DeWayne Craddock "as well as one other person," said Kevin Martingayle, an attorney working with Nixon's family. So on the night of May 30, Nixon had discussed with her husband, Jason, "whether or not she should take a pistol and hide it in her handbag," Martingayle said. She decided against it because of a city policy that prevents employees from bringing weapons to work.


The next day, Craddock, who had worked as a city public utilities engineer for nine years, used a .45-caliber handgun with a legally purchased silencer to fire at colleagues in Building 2 of the city's Municipal Center in Princess Anne.

On Monday, Martingayle revealed the detail about Nixon's worries on WHRV's "HearSay with Cathy Lewis" radio show.

"The night before it happened they had that discussion," he said on the show. "There was obviously something big going on."

Martingayle told Lewis that he didn't have any more details about Kate Nixon's comments.

Julie Hill, a city spokeswoman, said she was not aware of Nixon’s concerns. Hill stressed that police are investigating all aspects of the shooting, including the information Martingayle has shared.

"We are going to make sure that we cover everything that is a part of that ongoing investigation," she said.

The New York Times has reported that Craddock had recently begun acting strangely and got into physical "scuffles" with other city workers, including a "violent altercation on city grounds" in the week before the shooting. The Times also has reported he had been told that disciplinary action would be taken.

The Pilot has heard conflicting reports of such scuffles when interviewing city employees, and three said the information was inaccurate.




City Manager Dave Hansen has disputed the report, saying the gunman's job performance was "satisfactory" and that he was not facing any ongoing disciplinary action or forced to resign.

Martingayle was on the radio show Monday to re-emphasize the Nixon family's push for an external investigation into the shooting. Kate Nixon had worked for the city for 10 years.

"Clearly (family members) want answers, and as many answers as they can get," he told Lewis.


A week ago, Martingayle emailed city officials a letter on behalf of Kate Nixon's family, requesting that the city release all records about the gunman and launch an external investigation into what happened. The attorney compared such a review to a comprehensive report that followed the 2017 Charlottesville riots and said on the radio show that he'd love to see the same people take the helm.

If the city doesn't ask for an outside investigation, Martingayle added, "I'm hoping the attorney general will take it on himself and just do it."

A spokesman for Attorney General Mark Herring declined to comment.

In a statement emailed to The Pilot last week, Hill said: "These requests appear premature while the criminal investigation is ongoing."

Martingayle told The Pilot that releasing many of these records would be discretionary under Virginia's Freedom of Information Act, but "the only obvious person with a privacy interest would be the shooter himself."

"In a situation like this, the maximum level of transparency possible is appropriate," he added.

Martingayle told Lewis that he doesn't plan to take the issue to court, in part because he doesn't see "a path to the courtroom" due to sovereign immunity that protects municipalities from claims of legal wrongdoing.


https://pilotonline.com/news/local/virg ... a3b42.html

Gun Free Zones strike again. I hope that Attorney finds some kind of way to sue the city for neglect; disarming people and then failing to protect them.

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

More:

"She said, 'This guy's going to come back and shoot the place up,' " Jason Nixon said. He encouraged his wife to hide a pistol in her purse and take it to work — she had training and knew how to use it — but she didn't want to break city policy forbidding employees from bringing weapons to work.


Husband of Virginia Beach shooting victim speaks out about wife's concerns, city's response

ImageJason Nixon gets a hug from his daughter, Madilyn, on Tuesday, June 11, 2019, as he talks about losing his wife, Kate, during the mass shooting at the Virginia Beach Municipal Center. Nixon has called for an independent examination of the mass shooting.
VIRGINIA BEACH

Kate Nixon was a fixer.


As a supervisor in the public utilities department for a decade, she solved problems for the city and was described as logical and level-headed.

So when she told her husband, Jason, that she had concerns about two of her co-workers, he knew it was serious. She didn't like to be around DeWayne Craddock, a fellow engineer — he gave off "real bad vibes" and she'd had to write him up several times for issues with performance and attitude. They both worked on the second floor of Building 2 in the Municipal Center.

But on the night of May 30, it was another man she was most worried about. Kate told her husband that the man, whom Jason Nixon declined to identify, was set to be fired Friday and there was supposed to be a police escort on scene when it happened. While cooking dinner, she expressed her concerns.

"She said, 'This guy's going to come back and shoot the place up,' " Jason Nixon said. He encouraged his wife to hide a pistol in her purse and take it to work — she had training and knew how to use it — but she didn't want to break city policy forbidding employees from bringing weapons to work.

Shortly after 4 p.m. on May 31, it was Craddock who opened fire in Building 2, killing Kate and 11 others.

Her family is now pushing the city for answers. An attorney and longtime family friend has sent the city an email on their behalf requesting officials release all records related to the gunman and launch an independent investigation.

The city said the family's calls for an outside probe "appear premature" with the criminal investigation still ongoing. A spokeswoman did not return a request for comment Tuesday morning.

"My wife's dead," said Nixon. "When's the right time going to be?"
https://pilotonline.com/news/local/virg ... 0099b.html

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

Image

TDPerk
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Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by TDPerk »

williatw wrote:Image
Shame this place has never had a like button.
molon labe
montani semper liberi
para fides paternae patria

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

TDPerk wrote:
williatw wrote:Image
Shame this place has never had a like button.

Honorable mention:
Diogenes wrote:Image
Gives me a chuckle every time I see it.

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

At the Washington Post: What the media miss when talking about guns

The media’s omission of facts is sometimes so flagrant that it seems intentional. After the Virginia Beach attack, the Wall Street Journal noted, “In Virginia, it is legal to carry guns into public buildings, with a few exceptions.” While literally true, it is completely misleading not to explain that one of those exceptions forbids Virginia Beach employees from carrying permitted guns in public buildings where they work.
The national media also ignores stories of armed private citizens stopping would-be mass public shootings. On the rare occasions that they do cover the stories, they get them wrong. There have been dozens of such cases in recent years. Last fall, at a back-to-school event in Titusville, Fla., more than 200 youths were present when a man started firing his gun into the crowd. Fortunately, a vendor with a concealed handgun permit stepped in and shot the attacker, seriously injuring him. “This person stepped in and saved a lot of people’s lives,” Titusville Police Sgt. William Amos said. “He’s a hero.”



https://crimeresearch.org/2019/07/at-th ... bout-guns/

williatw
Posts: 1912
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by williatw »

The Year Gun Control Died

Gun opponents would leave predatory cops armed and their victims helpless.


Image

For fans of legal restrictions on self-defense rights, 2020 is a disaster. It provides continuing evidence that to push gun control proposals is to advocate that the likes of Derek Chauvin—the Minneapolis cop who killed George Floyd—should be armed, while the communities they terrorize should be helpless. It is also to insist that when police fail at their supposedly core task of protecting the public, people should be deprived of the means for defending themselves. As many Americans lose faith in law enforcement and do what's necessary to shield lives and property, it's unlikely that they'll be an enthusiastic audience for future disarmament schemes that would make those of us who don't work for government even more vulnerable to those who do.

Back in December,* prominent gun control advocate and then-presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg responded to reports that an armed church security guard stopped a would-be mass murderer by sniffing that such behavior is inappropriate.

"It may be true—I wasn't there and don't know the facts—that somebody in the congregation had his own gun and killed the person who murdered two other people, but it's the job of law enforcement to have guns and to decide when to shoot. You just do not want the average citizen carrying a gun in a crowded place," he said.

That comment hasn't aged well in a world dominated by names of victims of police violence such as George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, and uniformed perpetrators like former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.


Before he was charged with murder for the killing of Floyd, Chauvin had 18 prior complaints filed against him. Of the three other officers fired and charged over Floyd's death, Tou Thao also had a record of complaints—six in total, including one that resulted in a $25,000 settlement for the use of excessive force.

Chauvin and Thao are part of a larger problem. Five years after a U.S. Justice Department report called for changes in how the Minneapolis Police Department handles officer misconduct, "law enforcement agencies have lacked either the authority or the will to discipline and remove bad officers from patrol. They have also failed to set clear criteria on the use of force and de-escalation," according to The Marshall Project.

That's the back story leading up to George Floyd's death, which resulted in protests and riots across the United States.

In response to the disorder, the FBI asked the public to submit "information and digital media depicting individuals inciting violence." Americans promptly responded—with evidence of cops behaving badly from coast to coast.

"Many on Twitter quickly began sharing video clips and photos of police cracking down violently on protesters," noted Newsweek. "In some, an officer or officers attack a group of protesters, seemingly unprovoked. Other clips showed police spraying tear gas in protesters' faces or shoving them violently to the ground."

In Washington, D.C., law enforcement forcibly and very publicly ejected mostly peaceful protesters from the area in front of St. John's Episcopal Church so the president could stage a photo op.

How convincing can Bloomberg's "only cops should have guns" sentiment now be to Americans who have seen and shared fresh examples of unjustified and brutal police conduct?

Of course, police aren't the only ones terrorizing the public. Rioters and looters also put lives and property at risk, and in many areas law enforcement agencies have failed to do much about it.

Just days ago, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo complained about the performance of New York City cops. "The police in NYC were not effective at doing their job last night," he said. "Have you stopped looting in the past? Have you stopped rioting in the past? Do that again."

Residents of Chicago, Long Beach, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, and other communities voiced similar concerns as store windows were smashed, businesses burned, and people injured.

"We always assume when we need the police they'll be there for us," the disappointed manager of a looted Philadelphia ShopRite supermarket told The Wall Street Journal.

A good many Americans who weren't already enraged by examples of gratuitous police brutality were disgusted by evidence of law enforcement's ineffectiveness at a core responsibility. So, they took responsibility for their own safety—including people who fully support protests against police misconduct, but see no reason to allow themselves to be victimized by hotheads and opportunists.

In St. Paul, Minnesota, black residents stood armed guard against looters outside local businesses. Business owners in Kirkland, Washington, did the same.

"U.S. retailers are stepping up patrols by armed security guards and transferring merchandise to secure locations as widespread civil unrest sets back the economic recovery from the coronavirus shutdown," reports the Los Angeles Times.


Video captured a Bellevue, Washington, cigar shop owner chasing-off looters at gun point. In South Philadelphia, looters discovered why breaking into a gun shop is a high-risk proposition, with one of their number dead at the scene at the hands of the owner.

Many police departments conceded the limits of their abilities. In Florida, Sheriff Grady Judd advised Polk County residents to shoot looters. High-profile psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, a gun control supporter, marveled on Twitter that, when he called Santa Monica police over a protest-related confrontation, they told him, "Sir, the city is under attack. Do what you have to do." (He also observed officers "throwing tear gas at really peaceful people.")

For those who have been advising Americans for years that we should lay down our own weapons and trust armed government employees to protect us and treat us with respect, 2020 has been a massive reality check. The year so far has demonstrated (once again) that the police can't be relied upon to defend our lives and property, and often themselves pose threats against which we need to guard.

"It's the job of law enforcement to have guns and to decide when to shoot," Bloomberg and other gun control advocates insist.

No, thanks. If we were to follow the advice of those who would disarm us, we'd be even more at the mercy of Derek Chauvin and his buddies, and of anybody else with ill intent.

*CORRECTION: The original version of this article misidentified the month of Bloomberg's speech. It was December, not January.

https://reason.com/2020/06/05/the-year- ... trol-died/

The Case for Gun Control Is Dead

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUF2kY2 ... e=emb_logo

choff
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Re: Crime and Punishment: Oklahoma (& Texas) style!

Post by choff »

George Floyd might be alive and well today if he had been armed with a gun on the day Derek Chauvin arrested him.
CHoff

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