Anti-Gravity Matter = no dark matter

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zbarlici
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Location: winnipeg, canada

Anti-Gravity Matter = no dark matter

Post by zbarlici »

This guy thinks he`s onto something....


http://www.preston.u-net.com/AGMatter/Index.htm


What do you think?

TallDave
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Post by TallDave »

Well, I hear about things like the alleged Pioneer anomaly and I wonder. And this might explain that.

After review, this is interesting, but seems a bit amateurish. I'm not sure how you can fit a positive mass antigravitational particle into the Standard Model, and calling them "transparent" is a little odd.

Might be worth doing a more sophisticated model, though.

Barry Kirk
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Post by Barry Kirk »

Well, I have to ask the question.

It seems that a lot more of this anti-grav matter would be required than dark matter to explain galaxy rotation.

Since, Anti-Grav matter would tend to be uniformly distributed throughout the universe and the universe is mostly empty space, especially the spaces between galaxies and galaxy clusters.

To have enough Anti-Grav matter density to explain galaxy rotation, 99.999% of the matter in the universe would be of the anti-grav type.

How would that affect the expansion of the universe?

I'm not saying that it doesn't exist, but this is one more objection to it.

If it does exist, and we could synthesize it on earth, it would be really useful stuff. Think of a hot air balloon that takes you to the moon.

zbarlici
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Location: winnipeg, canada

Post by zbarlici »

Well this "anti-grav matter" and the regular matter repel each-other, so in the case of small objects in the universe, well these objects apparently end up in the areas with the least anti-grav density... with galaxies, the stars fall to the center because thats where anti-grav matter is the least dense...

Not sure how all the phenomenae(black holes, supernovae, etc) would get explained away using this anti-gav matter proposal. On the other hand, maybe very little changes would need to be made to support it.

Barry Kirk
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Post by Barry Kirk »

Remember that antigrav matter repels itself and normal matter. So, it's density should be quite low. And it should have a much lower density in the vicinity of Galaxy's.

The only reason it might have a large density where it could effect anything is if the universe contains a lot of it. Like 99.9% of matter in the universe is antigrav matter.

zbarlici
Posts: 247
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 2:23 am
Location: winnipeg, canada

Post by zbarlici »

TallDave wrote:Well, I hear about things like the alleged Pioneer anomaly and I wonder. And this might explain that.

After review, this is interesting, but seems a bit amateurish. I'm not sure how you can fit a positive mass antigravitational particle into the Standard Model, and calling them "transparent" is a little odd.

Might be worth doing a more sophisticated model, though.

by "pioneer anomaly" you`re talking about the "headwind" that it is getting on its way out of the solar system?

tonybarry
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Post by tonybarry »

Hello zbarlici,
The Pioneer anomay is the name given to the unexpected trajectory of the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. New Scientist has a series of articles on the subject, this is the latest:-

http://space.newscientist.com/article/m ... stery.html

-----
QUOTE from above article:-
Launched in the early 1970s, the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes are approaching the edge of the solar system from opposite directions, gradually slowing down as the sun's gravity tugs at them. But they are slowing down slightly more than expected and no one quite knows why. Some physicists argue that stronger gravity in the outer solar system can explain the so-called Pioneer anomaly.
-----

Regards,
Tony Barry

esecallum
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Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2007 11:14 pm

Post by esecallum »

tonybarry wrote:Hello zbarlici,
The Pioneer anomay is the name given to the unexpected trajectory of the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. New Scientist has a series of articles on the subject, this is the latest:-

http://space.newscientist.com/article/m ... stery.html

-----
QUOTE from above article:-
Launched in the early 1970s, the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes are approaching the edge of the solar system from opposite directions, gradually slowing down as the sun's gravity tugs at them. But they are slowing down slightly more than expected and no one quite knows why. Some physicists argue that stronger gravity in the outer solar system can explain the so-called Pioneer anomaly.
-----

Regards,
Tony Barry
what about electrostatic forces ?

the sun is emitting various charged particles...

the probe may have acquired a charge also relativeto the sun...

electrostatic forces are very strong even for a few charge imbalances..
compared to gravity...

TallDave
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Post by TallDave »


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