Inflatable Wind Turbines

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MSimon
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Postby MSimon » Wed Oct 03, 2007 1:32 am

Roger wrote:
MSimon wrote: this technology will destroy wind power except for niche applications. Same for solar.


A 100 years from now, sure. If the world struggles for a replacement of oil, then the mega watts that Solar & Wind can provide will be very important over the next 50 years untill fusion can provide the Lions share of energy production in the 2050-2100 time frame.

Building 15 or 20 GW of fusion capacity will take a while, while Solar & Wind already has a jump on fusion.


I believe if we have a working IEC fusion plant as a template we could roll out 1,000 per three years after the first one is completed. That is 100 GWe a year. In 10 years that is enough to double world electrical power generation.

If it is feasible it will roll out much faster than you think.

Roger
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Postby Roger » Thu Oct 04, 2007 3:06 am

MSimon wrote:
If it is feasible it will roll out much faster than you think.


I hear ya, but history says you're wrong.
I like the p-B11 resonance peak at 50 KV acceleration. In2 years we'll know.

OneWayTraffic
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Postby OneWayTraffic » Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:09 pm

I think that extremely long term, we may see solar as the ultimate source of power. I was reading a Peter Hamilton book where he had an antimatter generation station in very close orbit around a star. At that range, solar cells could produce megawatts per square meter assuming one had cells capable of withstanding the conditions.


Science fiction of course, but it may be viable in the next few centuries.

Roger
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Postby Roger » Fri Oct 05, 2007 4:04 am

OneWayTraffic wrote:Science fiction of course, but it may be viable in the next few centuries.


IIRC, I recently read that about 50 sq miles of solar panels, at 15% efficiency would power the world. Most panels currently commercially available are in the 15% to 20% range.
I like the p-B11 resonance peak at 50 KV acceleration. In2 years we'll know.

OneWayTraffic
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Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 3:35 pm

Postby OneWayTraffic » Fri Oct 05, 2007 1:16 pm

Roger wrote:
OneWayTraffic wrote:Science fiction of course, but it may be viable in the next few centuries.


IIRC, I recently read that about 50 sq miles of solar panels, at 15% efficiency would power the world. Most panels currently commercially available are in the 15% to 20% range.


I think that this is rather optimistic. The solar constant is a touch under 1500W/m^2. If these were in space; then 50sq miles= 128sq km=128,000,000m^2 of panels. At 1500 watts a square meter that's 192gigawatts of power available. At 10% efficiency, that's about enough power for a smallish country. If the panels were on the ground then output would be about 25% of that or less. I think 50,000 sq miles would be plenty.

Of course 50sq miles of panels at 10% efficiency a mere million miles from the sun would produce maybe 425TW if the inverse square rule applies so close.

So solar isn't a foolish energy concept at all, if one has the panels in the right place. Of course a fusion powered spaceship is the best way to get them there.

Roger
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Postby Roger » Fri Oct 05, 2007 4:33 pm

OneWayTraffic wrote:So solar isn't a foolish energy concept at all, if one has the panels in the right place. Of course a fusion powered spaceship is the best way to get them there.


LOL, YES. Touche~
I like the p-B11 resonance peak at 50 KV acceleration. In2 years we'll know.


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